The Commissioners

 

  • Sir Peter Gregson
  • Oliver Dean
  • Andrea Edmunds
  • Andrew Carter
  • Eleri Jones
  • Chris Murray
  • Lee Shostak
  • Judith Sykes
  • Pete Winkelman
  • Sir Peter Gregson

    Sir Peter Gregson

    The MK Futures 2050 Commission’s Chairman, Peter, is Chief Executive and Vice-Chancellor of Cranfield University. He was previously President and Vice-Chancellor of Queen's University Belfast (2004-13). He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering (2001) and the Royal Irish Academy (2007). He has been a Non-Executive Director of Rolls Royce Group plc (2007-12) and served on the Councils of the Royal Academy of Engineering (2005-08) and the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils (2004-06). He was knighted for services to Higher Education in 2011.
  • Oliver Dean

    Oliver Dean

    Oliver is a digital entrepreneur, based in Milton Keynes, with a successful portfolio of specialist digital businesses as well as an established radio presenting career. Oliver is Managing Director of APPLOAD Limited, specialists in digital, offering a range of services including a digital agency, 'MK21' and New Age Leisure. Oliver currently presents the Breakfast show for MKFM, who broadcast on FM in Milton Keynes and DAB Digital Radio across Beds, Herts, Bucks & Northants. His broadcasting career started at the age of 11 reporting on a Leicester City match for BBC Radio Leicester! By 13, he had a regular slot on BBC Three Counties Radio's Breakfast show, presenting numerous features ranging from gadget reviews to moral dilemmas put to the streets of Milton Keynes and has worked on several projects for BBC Radio 4.
  • Andrea Edmunds

    Andrea Edmunds

    Andrea is Director of Innovation at the Future Cities Catapult, where she heads the Insight team, working to ensure urban innovations are useful, desirable and valuable for people living in and leading cities. Previously, Andrea led the Service Design practice as Portfolio Director at global design and innovation firm IDEO, where she practiced for 12 years. Trained as an engineer, she has applied design to a wide range of public and private sector challenges, including sustainability, finance and health. She has taught design at several institutions, including her alma mater, Stanford University in California.
  • Andrew Carter

    Andrew Carter

    Andrew is Deputy Chief Executive of the Centre for Cities and has overall responsibility for the Centre’s research and policy programme. He is also Deputy Director of the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth. He has over 20 years of experience working on urban economic policy issues for public and private development agencies, consultants and research institutes. He has also spent time in the US as part of the Churchill Foundation’s Fellowship Programme reviewing urban economic development policy and practice in American cities including New York, Washington DC, Boston and Chicago. He is a regular media contributor and chairs and speaks at conferences across the UK and Europe on a wide range of urban and economic issues.
  • Eleri Jones

    Eleri Jones

    Eleri has led the Foresight Future of Cities project in the Government Office for Science for the last three years, which looks at the opportunities and challenges facing UK cities over the next 50 years. As well as sitting on the Milton Keynes 2050 Futures Commission, she is a member of the Bristol Trajectory 2050 Steering Group. Prior to leading the Cities project, Eleri led the Foresight Future Identities project and held a variety of posts in the Cabinet Office and DCLG. Before joining the UK Civil Service, Eleri spent five years working for the Canadian Federal Government and the Provincial Government of Ontario, developing social assistance policies and programmes.
  • Chris Murray

    Chris Murray

    Chris took up post as Director of the Core Cities Group in 2006. Chris is has recently been made an Honorary Fellow of the Heseltine Institute for Public Policy and Practice at Liverpool University, and has been appointed to the Advisory Board of the Prime Ministers’ Regeneration Investment Organisation, aimed at increasing overseas investment into urban regeneration. He is also the Chairman of award winning social enterprise company Fusion21, an intelligent procurement organisation that recycles profits into training unemployed people and helping them into work. Prior to this he has had a long association with economic development, regeneration, culture and public policy. Chris has previously worked in several EU countries, in Korea in relation to their national regeneration strategy, and with Eastern European cities. He has also been involved in Egan Task Force on Skills, establishing the Academy for Sustainable Communities and the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment. Before this Chris worked in local government for 10 years, establishing the UK’s first local authority cultural planning unit in Milton Keynes.
  • Lee Shostak

    Lee Shostak

    Lee is an economic development planner. He works with local authorities, public-private partnerships and private developers to promote major investment projects. He specializes in vision building, new towns, scenario development, economic and regeneration strategies, and impact assessment. Recent assignments include preparing: the Growth Strategy for Croydon; the Strategic Economic Plan for the South East Local Enterprise Partnership; growth strategies for the City of Oxford, Essex County, and Swindon and Wiltshire; a review of Newcastle’s major regeneration projects; and the proposals for a new cultural and education complex for the Olympic Park for the V and A East, University College London, and the creative industries. He is currently working closely with the promoters of a new market town, and he frequently advises local and central Government on regeneration, economic development, and garden cities. He prepared comprehensive regeneration plans for the Thames Gateway and Cardiff Bay. Prior to establishing Shared Intelligence in 2001, he established a new design and planning practice with Sir Terence Conran in 1980 (now part of AECOM) and before that he was the Director of Planning at Milton Keynes Development Corporation. He was Chair of the Town and Country Planning Association between 2008 and 2014.
  • Judith Sykes

    Judith Sykes

    Judith is Director at Useful Simple, specialists in sustainability strategies and environmental design. With a background in civil engineering consultancy and a Masters Degree in Sustainable Development from Cambridge University, Judith has 20 years experience developing and delivering sustainable products around the world. Recognised for her insightful and collaborative approach to urban development, Judith is regularly invited to speak on the complexities of sustainable design in the delivery of an integrated built environment. Judith has worked with government organisations, major developer clients and asset owners, and has a particular expertise in city and urban resilience, sustainable infrastructure design, asset management and closed loop engineering. Her projects include the London 2012 Olympics, HS2 Euston redevelopment and she is currently working with the City of São Paulo on a 4000 home social housing masterplan.
  • Pete Winkelman

    Pete Winkelman

    Pete moved to Milton Keynes in 1993 and established Great Linford Manor as one of Europe’s leading residential recording studios following a successful and varied career in the music industry in London. Whilst in Milton Keynes and inspired by the footballing exploits of his son, Bobby, Pete has worked tirelessly with the public and private sectors to deliver the new city’s 30- year ambition to host professional league football and develop a landmark multi-purpose sports and spectators events complex. The resulting stadiummk is the new home of MK Dons FC of which Pete is chairman. In 2015 the MK Dons were promoted to the Championship and the Rugby World Cup came to Milton Keynes with stadiummk hosting three record breaking attendances during the pool stages.

 

The Commission's Role

The future of Milton Keynes and its importance in the development of the UK economy is now being explored by a new commission of independent specialists initiated by Milton Keynes Council. The MK Futures 2050 Commission is exploring what makes a great city in terms of theory and practice, as Milton Keynes strives for economic growth, since it was first designated as a New Town nearly 50 years ago.

The MK Futures 2050 Commission comprises of nine independent specialists; its Chair is Sir Peter Gregson, Vice Chancellor at Cranfield University with all other commissioners drawn from a variety of backgrounds with either strong local connections or as experts in key topics that can give a wide range of knowledge and viewpoints to feed into the debate.

The Commission is set to engage and explore what it means to make a great city greater; discussing what factors could affect Milton Keynes over the coming decades and the possible future scenarios that could be created when thinking about those drivers.

The intention is that at the end of the Commission’s research, an evidence based report will be produced from a series of recommendations including viewpoints from stakeholders and will be put forward to Milton Keynes Council by July 2016.

It is hoped that the significance of the project will help to develop a framework, or a ‘deal’ with government, businesses and other relevant stakeholders to help put in place the arrangements that will help deliver the vision for Milton Keynes’ future.

Similarly, the recommendations of the Commission will also inform key strategies and policies for the Council, including the development of Plan:MK as the plan-making process are working in parallel, so the outputs of the Commission will also help refine and improve the emerging Plan:MK.  

Alongside the Commissioners, other external organisations are involved in the process as Expert Advisers. In particular, these involve Foresight Future of Cities, part of the Government Office for Science, who has been involved in similar futures work in other cities across the country. The Commission is also being supported by the Future Cities Catapult and Centre for Cities.

 

 

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